The Zoom Zoom was on West Franklin, right on the corner. [They served] a lot of the same stuff that the Rat did. Spaghetti, pizza, you know. Same kind of stuff. Cheap. Tuesday night, all you can eat spaghetti, $1.29.

When you're 19 years old and you're living in a dorm, the idea that you can go and stuff yourself on Tuesday night for $1.29—and of course you could drink beer as well—
it was great.

You'd get salad and you'd get bread and you'd get literally as many plates of spaghetti as you could handle. When you're 19 years old and you're living in a dorm, the idea that you can go and stuff yourself on Tuesday night for $1.29—and of course you could drink beer as well—it was great.

The Zoom [had] two rooms. You'd come in, not on the corner. You'd actually walk past the corner a little bit and turn in to the right. Big room. On the walls, paintings of scenes from Greece. The Acropolis, different scenes of hills and things, that was in the front room. And then there was a second room in the back, a little smaller but basically the same layout. A little darker. Two rooms, front and back, and then a kitchen in the back.

They actually opened a bar downstairs called Bacchus, that you could enter off of an alleyway off of Columbia Street between the insurance building and what's now that Japanese restaurant. That was downstairs, and that was just a bar, although you could get pizza and stuff there as well. That was linked to the Zoom by a set of stairs but you had to come in by a separate way. Danzigers owned that for a while too, I think. That was called Bacchus, like the god of wine, yeah. Like Bacchanalia. That was in the early '70s as well. So anyway, the Zoom was basically just two rooms, and the setting of tables. Nothing particularly fancy, but nice. Nice enough.

[The crowd was] hugely college students. Some graduate students, but you wouldn't see families there. If you'd go to The Zoom or to The College Cafe which was a cheap cafeteria on East Franklin or any of these places to eat at night, you have to remember that we didn't have, in the early 70s, we didn't have a dining hall on campus. We had the cafeteria worker's strike, and the dining hall shut down. The North Hall was the art department.

Steve Allred

There was a teen center at that time called the Cat Cellar. We were the mighty wild cats of Chapel Hill High School and it was under what was Bruegger's Bagels up until a few months ago. At that time, it was the Zoom Zoom restaurant, one of Bibi Danzinger's and one of the Danzinger family's many restaurants in Chapel Hill.

She had the Zoom-Zoom at that time, which was the first place I ever had a slice of pizza in my entire life. And in the basement of that building she had allowed the community to come in and build a teen center, which was just a place that we could hang out and go after school and they had ping-pong and shuffleboard. And we didn't have a pool table back then, because pool was considered to be kind of an evil sport that only drunkards played and so they never allowed us to have the pool tables in there.

Robert Humphreys

There was a high school rec center, and they had the greatest dances. They even had them for junior high kids. They would have one on Friday night, and then the high school would be there Saturday and great, unbelievable bands. It was between where the new Bunn's Restaurant is going and Investors Title.

I didn't even think about feeling safe or not safe. It was who you were going to dance with or who is going to break up, or who were you going to show. But, it was just great, great fun.

The one I remember the most, because Donny Sparrow decided not to dance with me that night, and I was as angry as I've ever been in my whole life. This was seventh grade.

Your parents would drop you off right there, and you would walk down that alley and then underneath that space. Again, the ceiling was low. It felt dark, and we would just come out of there, literally wringing wet because all your friends were there and you would have danced all night long.

The music was a lot of beach music. It was the Supremes, and the slow dancing song was Smokey Robinson and the Miracles. You didn't get that many of those, but when you did it was just like, "Yes!" because you didn't get to be with people very often otherwise.

It was just always fun. We liked to dance, and we looked forward to it every weekend. It wasn't a place where college kids went. It was really just us, and it was just a night that you could go there. I didn't even think about feeling safe or not safe. It was who you were going to dance with or who is going to break up, or who were you going to show. But, it was just great, great fun.

Missy Julian-Fox