I graduated from high school in 1971, so the late '60s I was downtown a lot. And that's when Franklin Street probably had the biggest impression on me.

There were things called "be-ins." In the 60s, there was something called "love-ins." Well, love-ins was probably a little bit risque for here.

Chapel Hill was... I don't know if that's where we originally got the reputation as a liberal bastion, but there were a number of antiwar protests downtown. There were antiwar protests on a weekly basis downtown. And um, there were things called "be-ins."

In the 60s, there was something called "love-ins." Well, love-ins was probably a little bit risque for here. I think be-Ins existed everywhere, where you just went and you were. You be-in. You were there. I mean it's uh, what is "be"? You just went and hung out, listened to music, danced and did whatever you wanted to do. But for a junior high or high school student as I was it was pretty cool stuff. And you know, there was nothing to keep us from going across Franklin Street onto the campus and sort of being part of that, and that's what we did.

The wall in front of Silent Sam was a teenager hangout. I guess it's no longer that way, it's not, but that's what we do on Friday nights, we'd go hang out downtown on the wall. And we did what teenagers do. It was a small town. If the police caught us out late at night, doing things we weren't supposed to be doing, they just sent us home. They got to know us, and it was pretty easy.