Jimmy Mousmoules, he was one of my favorite characters on Franklin Street and I'd go over to Jimmy's, I mean, Jeff's Confectionery and he'd make a Coke for us, one of the little small six once ones.

After a football game, certainly Franklin Street would be completely mobbed. But where the scoreboard was, you couldn't even get through the street.

And he always had a roundabout rack of comic books that my brother and I were probably his best comic book customers. You could sit on the floor of that place and drink your Coke and read comics, and Jimmy would just think that you were fine. You know, as long as you were well mannered. I didn't know that they sold "Playboys" and "Hustlers" and all sorts of magazines for a really long time. It was just the place to get the best crushed ice and sometimes he'd invite me behind the counter so I could push the syrup to make my own Coke. My brother and I spent so many hours in that store.

That business had been there, Jimmy's uncle I think started it—who was the original Jeff—and he must have started it in 1910, certainly by '20s. Just imagine, there were only radios. No TV either, only radios, not everybody has one. So he would post all the college football scores, or basketball scores, or whatever teams were playing outside. He used like a washable paint... everybody in town, not just the college kids, everybody would gather around this scoreboard.

It was an enormous blackboard with white lines painted on it. Skinny white lines, because they must have reported probably 50 different teams. And so it would be who was playing and then the score. So, that would be the place that you would find out what happened at the Duke game. What happened at Clemson? What happened with Harvard? Every school that you could think of. After a football game, certainly Franklin Street would be completely mobbed. But where the scoreboard was, you couldn't even get through the street.

And so word would just sort of be passing, oh, did you hear about this? Oh look it's up there! And that's how everybody found out what the scores were. The scoreboard was the place you went to find out.